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With over 158,000 print titles in our collection, the Supreme Court Library provides the most comprehensive range of legal resources in Queensland to the judiciary, legal profession and members of the public with matters before the Courts.

Each week, a selection of important titles recently added to the collection are reviewed by members of the level 16 Quay Central chambers. A full list of new titles is available online via our catalogue, with copies also available for perusal at the Brisbane Reference Desk.

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New Titles

  • The Struggle for Unity - A Story of The Federation of Australia

    Graham Wilcox, The Struggle for Unity - A Story of The Federation of Australia (Self Published, 2014)

    2 October 2015
    The author is the great grandson of Sir Arthur Rutledge. The book is primarily a biography of Rutledge, but also tells the story of his involvement in the formation of Australia as a nation. Queensland, in particular, proved to be initially unwilling to join the Commonwealth. The author considers that this reticence to join the Commonwealth was driven largely by the fact that, in the north of Queensland, Pacific Islanders had been captured to work, virtually as slaves and this was strongly opposed in the south. The author attributes to Rutledge a persuasive campaign that eventually got Queensland narrowly to vote yes in the referendum to join the Commonwealth. This is a sympathetic look at a lesser known Queenslander, lawyer, parliamentarian, Attorney-General for Queensland, and delegate at the 1891 Federation Convention. It is an interesting read and shines some additional light on a formative period of Australian history.

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  • Law of Compulsory Land Acquisition

    Marcus Jacobs, Law of Compulsory Land Acquisition (Thomson Reuters, 2nd ed, 2015)

    7 August 2015
    It is six years since the publication of the first edition of this comprehensive exposition of the law of compulsory land acquisition. Marcus Jacobs QC has meticulously collected the legislation and cases that concern the eight State and Territory legislatures plus the Commonwealth legislation. The first edition was described as "encyclopedic" as to its treatment of the subject and that remains true. Jacobs has conducted an analysis that includes comparative common law jurisdictions and an array of academic writings. The second edition updates the works treatment of legislative changes and the related case law consequent of the many infrastructure projects put in place over the last six years.

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  • Native Title in Australia

    Richard H Bartlett, Native Title in Australia (LexisNexis Butterworths, 3rd ed, 2014)

    14 December 2014
    This comprehensive text, now in its third edition, takes a broad look at native title, firmly situating the development of native title law in Australia in context and allowing for historical perspective at the same time as contemplating future trends in the law. This edition contains a discussion of several recent High Court decisions on native title – Akiba v Commonwealth (2013), Karpany v Dietman (2013) and Western Australia v Brown (2014) – as well as a reflection on the two decades that have elapsed since the decision in Mabo v Queensland (No 2) (1992). A new Part 5 has been added to this edition, titled “Right to Negotiate, Agreement and Settlements and Compensation”, reflecting the growing importance of settlement agreements in native title disputes.

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  • The Law of Misleading or Deceptive Conduct

    Colin Lockhart, The Law of Misleading or Deceptive Conduct (LexisNexis Butterworths, 4th ed, 2015)

    11 December 2014
    With its focus on the legislative prohibitions on misleading and deceptive conduct, this indispensable practitioner text provides detailed analysis and comprehensive coverage of the substantial body of case law generated in this area. The last edition was published only a month or so after the introduction of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 and the associated Australian Consumer Law in January 2011, and this fourth edition is a welcome update with over 1000 new decisions considered. Given that the bulk of the decisions to date have dealt with conduct that took place before 31 December 2010, this edition continues to refer throughout to both TPA/FTA provisions as well as the ACL.

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  • Nygh’s Conflict of Laws in Australia

    Richard H Bartlett, Nygh’s Conflict of Laws in Australia (LexisNexis Butterworths, 9th ed, 2014)

    3 December 2014
    The ninth edition of this useful and comprehensive textbook on the conflict of laws in Australia is a comprehensive update accounting for the recent authorities on the subject and important legislative changes, including Australia’s ratification of the Hague Service Convention in late 2010, the enactment of the Trans-Tasman Proceedings Act 2010 (Cth) and the adoption of the Federal Court Rules 2011 (Cth). It is, as previously, divided into parts addressing, first, jurisdiction and procedure and choice of law generally; second, the applicable rules thematically, by area of law, including for example the law of obligations, family law, cross-border insolvency and arbitration; and, finally, the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments and awards in Australia.

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  • Wenliang Zhang, Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in China (Kluwer Law International, 2014)

    3 December 2014
    With the conclusion of negotiations moving Australia closer to the signature of a landmark free-trade agreement with China, the ability to enforce foreign, or particularly Australian, judgments in China only increases in importance. China is not a party to the Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Civil and Commercial Matters. However, Zhang in this book based on his doctoral thesis, deals comprehensively with the three different avenues for recognition and enforcement currently available in China – national law based processes for recognition and enforcement, which have numerous hurdles including the requirement of reciprocity and the requirement that the judgment not contradict the basic principles of the laws of China nor violate its national sovereignty, security and social and public interests; enforcement under bilateral treaties, which Zhang notes presents a significantly more effective avenue for recognition and enforcement; and enforcement under particular subject-specific multi-lateral treaties. Zhang’s account comprehensively addresses both the current law and practice in relation to each avenue, adding useful insights into the workings of the Chinese legal system and what they mean for recognition and enforcement.

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  • Criminal Law in Queensland and Western Australia - Cases and Commentary

    Eric Colvin, Justice John McKecknie and Jodie O’Leary, Criminal Law in Queensland and Western Australia - Cases and Commentary (LexisNexis Butterworths, 7th ed, 2014)

    26 November 2014
    Queensland and Western Australia share the common heritage of Sir Samuel Griffiths’ criminal code, first enacted in 1899 and 1913 respectively. This text book, now in its seventh edition, provides a modern account of those two codes and related legislation, addressing where appropriate how they have diverged from each other over the last century. This text, primarily written for university students, includes relevant extracts from the leading cases and an accessible analysis of the related legal principles also of use to legal practitioners.

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  • Banking Law in Australia

    Alan Tyree, Banking Law in Australia (LexisNexis Butterworths, 8th ed, 2014)

    26 November 2014
    Banking Law is a field that brings together well-worn but often obscure law with modern technology and ongoing regulatory innovation. In this context, Dr Tyree’s text gives an accessible and clearly presented account of the law of banking in Australia. The eighth edition updates this account including to address a number of major developments since the last edition, published in 2011, most notable being the 2013 Code of Banking Practice and the entry into force of the Personal Property Securities Act 2009 (Cth). While this latest edition has extended the text’s discussion of the Australian banking regulatory system, its coverage of the law of cheques has been reduced to reflect that subject’s reducing importance in modern banking practice

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  • Court and Bowled - Tales of Cricket and the Law

    James Wilson, Court and Bowled - Tales of Cricket and the Law (Wildy, Simmonds & Hill Publishing, 2014)

    26 November 2014
    This book delivers on its promise, serving the reader with a collection of tales about cricket broadly related in some way or another to the law. This book will be of interest not only to those with a keen interest in cricket, but to any reader who will enjoy a well written and lively collection of tales often as much about human failings and politics as about cricket. Of those stories, none is better known to lawyers than Lord Denning’s tribute to the delights of village cricket in his Lordship’s judgment in Miller v Jackson, refusing relief to the hapless newcomers who happened to have built their home abutting the village cricket ground. In this book Wilson moves from tale to tale in a thematic way between tales including about ‘the Demon Drink’, England’s brush with apartheid South Africa in the Basil D’Oliveira affair (‘the Despots’), Kerry Packer’s battle with the ICC in the late 1970’s with World Series Cricket (‘the Revolutionary’) and a number of infamous libel actions (‘The Libels’). The final chapters then seek to draw upon the legal themes discussed, consider the spirit and law of cricket itself, and expresses the author’s thoughts on a number of controversial subjects, including the role of umpires in the technological age.

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  • Federal Constitutional Law - A Contemporary View

    Sarah Joseph and Melissa Castan, Federal Constitutional Law - A Contemporary View (Thomson Reuters, 4th ed, 2014)

    21 November 2014
    The fourth edition of this work takes into account a number of new constitutional developments since the publication of the third edition some 13 years ago. These include the decisions of the High Court in Williams v Commonwealth (the school chaplains case) and Commonwealth v ACT (the same sex marriage case). It is a scholarly work directed at students, researchers, and practitioners of constitutional law.

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